Six-on-Saturday – Malus April Dolan

Aurinia was formerly known as Alyssum. Taxonomists recently moved it to a new family. I don’t know what it is they know that prompted the poor thing to be expelled and re-classified, but when I discovered this trickery on Tuesday, I was moved to investigate further.

24th April, 2021.

It’s been a week of two halves. Initially, the first half lasted two days, while the second was longer. That’s the way with halves. Never the same. Dull and foggy, followed by bright sunshine and fresh easterly breezes. I made great headway in emptying out the glasshouse, got my spuds and tomatoes planted and enjoyed more cycling in one week than the entire month of March. Nights are still cool, so I’m ever watchful of the many tender plants outside, but I’m moving safely towards last frost date.

Here we go again for the last Saturday of April. Read along for a bit of fun, a small amount of useless information, some nostalgia and preparations for an upcoming world event.

1. Aurinia Gold Ball

This week one of my two Aurinia Gold Ball rockery plants is in bloom. Notice how I phrased that very carefully. Interestingly, there’s a second one that is way behind and not likely to get to this stage for another month or so. It would be very unusual, but not unheard of, to encounter one of the two Gold Ball rockery plants way behind. I wonder why is this? I wrote about this five years ago, explaining how the process of flowering and setting seed works. I think I should put a disclaimer with it, stating that all opinions are my own. I may be talking through my hat.

I’ll do two things as soon as flowering has finished. Firstly, I’ll trim the plant back very carefully with my sharp new secateurs, all the while adhering to the new Safe Thumb Positioning Policy. Secondly, to contradict above, I’ll leave one corner untouched in order to allow seeds to ripen. It’ll be somewhat like a number two haircut with a bobble. The seeds will be collected, dried and grown in the Autumn. I believe it’s also possible to propagate Aurinia from softwood cuttings taken in May. Therefore, I’ll use some of the trimmings to make more. Double-jobbing.

Aurinia was formerly known as Alyssum. Taxonomists recently moved it to a new family. I don’t know what it is they know that prompted the poor thing to be expelled and re-classified, so when I discovered this trickery on Tuesday, I was moved to investigate further. I read lots of information that is quite useless to me, but I’m happy to note that the plant is not liked by deer. I can now safely take down garden walls on all sides.

2. Gone To Pot

Fifty plastic pots arrived from Dublin last week. Each one had contained a rose, and the pots were offered free of charge. My friend collected them for me and now they are filled with Dahlias and Begonias. I have removed the top shelf to fit these bigger containers. I’ll be planting some of my tomatoes inside as soon as I’ve got a chance to remove all the shelving from the other side.

Hey presto, voilà! I’ve managed to move seed trays and plants to the other side and the shelves have been removed. The shelving will be used on the patio. To improve drainage I’ll put all the summer pots on them, rather than directly on the ground. The tomatoes and cucumber are in their final summer position, and I await an early crop this year. I have some tumbling tomatoes that will go in pots outside, but that will wait for a further week or two.

Someone mentioned recently that it’s like musical chairs, all this moving things around from month to month. That’s exactly what is necessary in a very small space.

3. Not Very Interesting At All

Here’s a close up of a pot containing a dahlia.  Of course, the dahlia cannot be seen so you’ll just have to take my word for it. Not very interesting, you say? I agree, not very interesting.

I inserted a few twigs of fuchsia to deter birds from enjoying a dust bath. The twigs were cut last Autumn and kept for this purpose, but guess what happened? When inserted in soil, the twig that was cut almost six months ago has sprouted! Surely, you’ll agree that’s interesting? This was not meant to happen!

4. Bluebells

This photograph does not do justice to the beauty of the bluebells. They were not my choice for planting back in 2016, but they’re growing on me. They are definitely worth a short paragraph.

5. Crab Apple Blossom

About ten years ago I gave a budding cyclist my second bike for a few months. She had joined our local cycling club and was studying for her Leaving Certificate exams if I am not mistaken. Towards the end of that summer she returned the bike, together with a gift of this apple tree. I wonder how did she know that I was into gardening, and I wonder did she know that I might be writing about the episode a decade later? Therefore, continuing my policy of renaming plants whose real name is unknown to me, I hereby christen this lovely tree Malus April Dolan. Dolan was the make of the bike, red and much loved. Many years later, as I moved along up the bike ladder to a much-more-loved bike, I gave Dolan to my cousin, and it continued to ride the roads of West Waterford until very recently. During my time in the saddle, its career highlight was the ascent of Alpe d’Huez in July 2006. We did not set any time records, Dolan and I. Later the same day I crashed and broke my little finger lúidín, caused by an over-zealous Frenchman. Right hand, same as last week. I could do up an injury CV, so I could.

The tree has matured to give me much pleasure and summer shade. I did think that the night frosts of the last two weeks would damage the emerging blossom, but it seems to have come through the hardship with flying colours. A bit of hardship is character-building.

I’ve decorated it betimes with Christmas baubles, and resolved to broaden my decorating skills this year. The broken belt buckle is significant in this regard. I’m informed that next Saturday is World Naked Gardening Day and I’ll be putting my best foot forward. I shall not name my two informants.

6. Broad Beans Again

There are over two dozen broad bean plants growing well on the vegetable bed at the back of the garden. Some were sown last autumn, while others are spring babies. As you’ve probably guessed, this one is from Autumn and I’ve potted it and put it among my patio plants. You could say that it’s a put-pot-patio-plant. I keep thinking that the flowers are eyes looking at me. I’m thinking it would be best to throw a blanket over them next weekend!

Sin a bhfuil uaimse don seachtain seo. I’ll be back again next week with another Six-on-Saturday. Thank you for reading, and to Jon for getting us all together every week. Have a good week. Slán go fóill.

Pádraig.

Six-on-Saturday – Conveyor Belt Required

It would be good to add vibrant red to the new Raised Seating Corner. But I’ll save that for later. I don’t want to be seen to accept suggestions too quickly.

17th April 2021.

I’ll tell you one thing, and one thing only. It would kill a saint. I’m not really much into saints, but I’d imagine that a saint would take a serious amount of killing.

Here’s the thing… I’ve got five large planters with three begonias in each. They do not fit anywhere in the glasshouse because they’re too heavy for the shelving. I have them in the shed by night, and they need to be brought out every morning. I cannot even leave them in the cold-frame because it has been removed to make way for the planting of my maincrop spuds. I think this daily pilgrimage will need to continue until the end of this month, particularly if night temperatures don’t pick up a bit. A conveyor belt would lighten my daily load.

Rather than dwell on this demanding daily ritual, it would be better to highlight some things in the garden that are sparkling, things that bring joy and comfort. How many things, I wonder? Why, of course… it’s Saturday, so six should do it! Let us begin.

Unfurling

My Lovely Fern is unfurling. It’s a bit blurred, but no matter. I had left last year’s growth in place until the middle of last month. It’s a way of providing shelter to the core of the plant during the coldest months. In this case, the plant is in a very sheltered spot and only some of the outer sections were frost-damaged.

As soon as I cut back the old growth, I admired the formation at the centre. As in previous years, I would check progress almost daily as I pass by, waiting for The Unfurling. When it happens, it’s just stunning. Unbe-ferny-lievable! I wish I could put a camera on it for a few days and do a bit of advanced time-lapse trickery.

Note: My Lovely Fern is a variation of My Lovely Horse, taken from the very successful BBC comedy Father Ted. The only difference is that My Lovely Horse is a song, and the other one is… not a song. Would you like to sing along? You can do so here. Much laughing is encouraged, but doing both together takes from the beauty of the music.

Building Castles

Last year I worked part-time at my local garden centre. For the most part, I enjoyed it very much. Of course, it became very clear to me that I wanted to spend most of my wages on plants and accessories! One other bright spot in this experience was that I had an almost unlimited access to used plastic pots. However, since last year, I’ve undertaken an enormous growing project. Presently, there are over a hundred little plants in the glasshouse, and that’s after the giving-to-friends that started last week. Pots need to be washed and sterilised in order to keep Abbeyside infection free, but it’s a job I do not like. I had been given lots of pots by friends but I had left them in water for three weeks. Finally, on Wednesday last, I got round to finishing the job.

Female Royalty

On Monday I visited the garden centre to buy spray for potato blight and came home with a few extras. These seeds will provide great colour over the summer, and into next year in the case of the Penstemon. What caught my eye at home, as I added them to My Seed List, was that there’s an inbuilt Royalty Theme, as all are given female titles… Queen, Duchess and Empress. Does an Empress outrank a queen? I may return next week to search for some male equivalents.

I wonder is it a marketing ploy? Do plants with female names sell better than Bishop’s Children, Sweet William, Bachelor’s Buttons, Rosa Just Joey or Cotoneaster Tom Thumb? I can’t imagine Tom being up to much in the company of the distinguished ladies.

Home Sweet Home

I was doing a clean-up in the shed on Monday and I spotted this hanging from the ceiling. I think it’s a wasp’s next. Can anyone confirm or inform me otherwise? Unfortunately, in my efforts to see if there was anything inside, I knocked it. It is incredibly fragile and the interior is a marvel. As it turns out, I wouldn’t have been happy having this nest within the shed.

Update: yes it has been confirmed as as wasp nest,and some advice too…

It would get to be twice the size of a football with maybe 5000 wasps in it. It is started at this time of the year, by a queen wasp, just after coming out of hibernation. And grows exponentially,  as the number of worker wasps increases. I would flatten it now with the back of a spade if I were you.

D. H.

I’ll be very busy between now and the end of May. That’s the date I have in my head to get all the big work done, and after that, it’s time to relax and enjoy the summer garden. With the exception of tending vegetables and watering plants, June, July and August are mostly for sitting and relaxing, eating and socialising. Oh, please let there be some socialising!

Lily Gurt Mór

I had been reading back through my article about Lily Gurt Mór, written last July. Here’s the state of play right now. There are four that are about 10cm above ground. I had been waiting for them, wondering had they survived the winter, dejected when I thought they hadn’t, and overjoyed to finally see them pop through. It’s time now to add some fresh topsoil and start feeding them.

Lily Gurt Mór is the name I’ve given to these trumpet Lilies. Gurt is South West England vernacular, meaning very large, used semi-frequently by Devon bloggers of note. I like it, and have added “mór”, our Irish equivalent, to emphasise just how tall these Lilies will climb.

Vibrant Red

This brightly-coloured pot, with polyanthus and cyclamen is on the opposite end of the Gurt Mór ladder. Bought just before Christmas, there was also a type of frosted conifer that soon died. Now, the remaining combination is having a second flush. I’ve moved it around a bit, and it looks great just under the budding fuchsia. Having said that, I’m tempted to follow Nora’s advice. It would be good to add vibrant red to the new Raised Seating Corner. But I’ll save that for later. I don’t want to be seen to accept suggestions too quickly!

I’m regularly skinning my head going in and out of the glasshouse because the lintel is too low. But this week, I’ve done further damage. While pruning my little Hebe Rhubarb & Custard with the very sharp new secateurs, I snipped a little piece of something other than the plant. Just happened that the top of my thumb was in the wrong place. There was perfect calm as I was bandaged up, but plenty screaming and doubling over the following day when I hit it off a bedside locker while assisting with the changing of sheets. I really will have to stop doing bedsheets. Interestingly, tieing shirt buttons, shoelaces and washing face with one hand are wonderful experiences that are teaching me lessons.

The unfortunate event has added a whole new meaning to the Covid catchphrase Stay Safe! That’s my lot for this week, a cháirde. Thumbs up! I’ll be back with more next Saturday an Satharn seo chugainn. In the meantime, please visit Mr. Propagator’s garden blog where you can find many more Six on Saturday articles from around the world, together with details of how to participate if that’s your thing. I hope you have a great week. Slán go fóill.

Pádraig.

Six-on-Saturday – Rare And Unusual

I’m very pleased with the updated raised seating corner. I’m calling it The RSC. I may make some minor adjustments with the planters.

10th April 2021.

It’s a bit early in the year, really. I didn’t think I’d be asking for rain until much later. But there you have it. My garden could do with a sup of rain. I’ve been watering and dipping many of my potted plants following a very warm week before Easter, and this week has been very cold but dry. I think I’m beginning to sound like a farmer!

Then, along came the double-whammy, a farmer’s worst fear. I was concerned about the low temperature in the glasshouse since last Tuesday, so the electric heater was turned on and the fleeces were used. Sure, I’d do the same if the temperature inside the house became dangerously low. It’s a survival tactic. Bloody weather! It’s like Goldilocks’ porridge.

So, in order to not sound like a farmer, I’m moving along quickly to six things that made me happy. I’m also giving advance notice that I’m including four never-before-seen varieties, and encouraging everyone to try them out. Trials have been very successful, and I’m very proud to display them here first.

I’m also encouraging readers to pay a visit to Jon The Propagator, whose diligence keeps this entire Six-on-Saturday thingy ticking over nicely. To quote Gill, let us proceed.

Spirea

You’d be forgiven for thinking this was taken in Autumn, but in fact it’s the leaves emerging just this week.  This is Spirea, also known as not-so-rare-and-unusual Japanese Magic Carpet. I think it was bought last year and tucked in tightly in the Patio Potpourri. It is deciduous, of course, and I moved it away to the gable end of the Seomra last November. It looks a bit scraggly and would probably be best planted in the ground. That’s a small job for my list over the coming weeks. It needs full sun, so I’m limited to where I’ll put it. For the moment though, I’ll enjoy these beautifully coloured leaves.

By the way, the “Seomra” is Marion’s craft room. It is an integral part of the garden, so perhaps it needs a Saturday feature all of its own?

Frost Protection

I have plenty seedlings of French Marigolds in the glasshouse. I’m told that, apart from being very colourful later in summer, they are beneficial if planted among the vegetables. There’s something about them that keeps the bugs away. Anyway, it’s too early to be planting these little things outside. The frost will kill them. But I did plant them, and I’ve given them the perfect protection. This upturned half-bottle was used. The variety is Lidl Naturis Orange Juice. I’ve put a few here and there among the peas and broad beans.

Camellia Spring Festival

Featured about a month ago, here’s the new Camellia in full flower. I’m imagining this in about three years time when it will have filled up and out. This is the not-so-rare-and-unusual Spring Festival variety.

Peas

I’m hoping to avoid using slug pellets from now on. There are many garden plants that can survive constant attacks from the slimy creatures and it’s a case of live and let live. However, when it comes to the vegetable beds, it’s a completely different matter. I’ve been reading and YouTubing to find alternative methods of killing the saboteurs.

We bought a DeLonghi coffee machine before Christmas, and I’ve been putting the coffee grounds on the compost heap since, but I have changed tactics only last week. Apparently, slugs and snails are repelled by the smell of coffee and therefore it makes sense for me to spread as much as I can around the base of vegetables. In this case, it’s the peas that I mentioned last week. They’ve been planted and caffinated. In fact, it’s a double win, because the grounds add nitrogen as well. Variety: Aldi Velo Tandem Whole Bean Coffee. It’s a mouthful, to be sure, very tasty for us humans, but not for slugs.

It’s the opposite with beer. Slugs and snails go mad for it. I had bought little plastic traps and showed them here recently. However, another YouTube video highlighted this new model that can be seen at top right. I’ve simply cut a hole in a milk carton and placed it in the soil. In this case, the peas will be doubly protected, and the carton can be emptied and refilled every few  weeks. Variety: Lidl Coolmore Creamery Fresh Whole Milk.

Vantage Point

Layout #1: Water feature in corner.

I’m very pleased with the upgraded raised seating corner. I’m calling it The RSC. I may make some minor adjustments with the planters, and I think chair colour other than black would be good. The planters will be filled with trailing annuals and a climbing Sweet Pea. I will also check the garden centres tomorrow to see if they’ve got any Lilies left in stock. The scent would be gorgeous while sitting here. I’m undecided about the bamboo, but it will do for the time being. Of the two layouts, which one do you fancy?

#2: Planter in the corner

Alternatively, I may start a small collection of plants in pots. The area is in shade until mid-afternoon, so I’ll put on my thinking cap for a while. That usually works. Variety: Fruit of The Loom Blue Cotton.

Acer

This little Acer is surrounded by the dazzling colour of daffodils and primroses, and is protected on all sides. I did not notice until mid-week that it has come into leaf. It just snuck up on me. Now is the time to take it from among its plant comrades and give it a place where it can shine.

April is like that. One day there’s nothing, the next something has grown. A further example is the tall Galway Lilies that were magnificent last year. I watched and waited but there was no sign of them. I had given up, but they have emerged and are stretching day by day. I’ll show them next week.

And now it’s goodbye from me, but the story continues next week. I’m going to make myself a tasty coffee, and might even add in a spoon of brandy. Heaven at eleven! A combination of DiLonghi Velo and Hennessey. Sláinte!

Pádraig.

Wordless Wednesday Video

Daytime temperatures were down to 5-7°C with a skinning NE wind. I call it a lazy wind. It would go through you rather than go around.

7th April 2021.

It’s been a very cold week. There was a frost on Monday night, and a very light frost last night. We lit the stove to keep us extra warm, and I set the heater in the glasshouse on constant both nights.

Daytime temperatures were down to 5-7°C with a skinning NE wind. I call it a lazy wind. It would go through you rather than go around. Looking at the video below, you’d never think it!

Click link HERE

Tá video ghearr den gháirdín thuas ar an YouTube anseo.

Today is a bit warmer, perfect for some structural trellis work.

Pádraig.

GrowWriteRepeat | Social Links |

Happy Easter

Gorgeous week of weather.

Sunday, 4th April 2021.

Mint
The biggest egg
Shadows
Support Samaritans
Flanders Sunday
  • Kasper Asgreen won De Ronde von Vlaanderen.
  • Gorgeous week of weather.
  • A virtual 60th birthday celebration.
  • Cycling in shorts. Two easy spins and one other.
  • We completed the virtual cycling challenge for Mental Health & Suicide Awareness.
  • Swallows are back. Seen near Mahon Bridge.

Pádraig.

Six-on-Saturday – Hakuna Matata

Happy plants can survive the ups and downs of life. Not alone that, but they blossom most beautifully when the time is right.

3rd April 2021.

I put a bit of thought into my Saturday articles. Some weeks things fall into place easily, while at other times my six items are just that. Six separate items in my garden this week, and that’s perfectly OK too. But I do try to link things up if I can. Writing is an important way for me to make sense of the world. Very soon I’ll have it all figured out, and then it’ll be time to stop.

My thoughts this week relate to switching off the daily news bulletins about Covid, following a corrupt incident in Dublin last week, where surplus doses left over after vaccinations at a private hospital were given to staff of a local private school. Daddy, hospital boss, child, school. Down with that sort of thing.

I’m happier now that the decision is made. The greed and corruption of the upper echelons within society will no longer drag me downwards. I am reminded of the movie The Lion King and in particular the problem-free philosophy that allows us to develop as good humans. It’s called Hakuna Matata, and it means no worries for the rest of our days! That’s something to sing about on this first Saturday of April. Let’s see if I can link it to some garden stuff…

Broad Beans

Broad Bean Super Aquadulce

The Broad Beans are flowering but also being nibbled by something rud éigin. I’ve put up some climbing supports but that will not stop the nibbling. I also planted another row of seeds three weeks ago for a later harvest but nothing has appeared. It’s likely there’s underground nibbling afoot as well, so I’ve resorted to plan B, sowing a batch in modules in the glasshouse, and I’ll plant them out when they get to a about 5-10cm.

Happy Easter.

Much of society is being nibbled and devoured, day in day out. Nibbling is generally done by those higher up on the food chain. Getting even doesn’t work, but a plan of action for self-care does help.

Saxifrage Peter Pan

This little rockery plant has been in its little spot for five years le cúig bliain and seems very happy there. At the time I bought three of these, but the other two have not survived. A few days ago, I found out the likely reason. The plant needs sun and partial shade. In other words if it is in full sunshine all day it will struggle. Death by sunstroke! This one is sheltered for part of the day behind an Agapanthus that reaches about 40cm. The two that died had no sun protection.

Problem-free philosophy.

Who makes up plant variety names? If I produce a new variety can I call it whatever I want? As an aside, I am frequently amused by the names given to horses, for example Call The Beacon or There You Go Now. A further aside is my habit of naming a variety in memory of someone, but perhaps I should go one step further? Any variety whose name I don’t know, I could simply make one up! I’d never be accepted for mention in the horticultural journals, but I’d have a way of distinguishing one variety from another. For example, if I have another unknown Saxifrage I could call it Saxifrage Alum Rock. I have cousins living in the Alum Rock area of Birmingham, and I have a feeling that a name allocated by myself is less likely to be forgotten by myself.

Happy plants can survive the ups and downs of life. Not alone that, but they blossom most beautifully when the time is right! I’m more than happy to be noticing this small miracle than seeing examples of power battles on my news feed. Beauty amid the rubble.

Peas

Pea Onward 13/03/21

Similar to the Broad Beans, it appears that pea seeds go missing regularly. I’ve come across this little ditty, which seems accurate.

One for the mouse,
One for the crow,
One to rot,
One to grow.

Now I understand why there are enough peas in the packet to feed an army. By the time the select few grow to maturity, there’ll surely be enough for us. We are a small family! This variety is also known to me as Pea Legs 11.

Enough for everyone.

I’m happy to plant forty, in the knowledge that ten will be delicious. Everything else is of no consequence to me. No worries.

Dahlia

Dahlia Disco Dancer.

Apart from the large Dahlias planted in the ground and in pots, I chose to grow some lots from seed this year. I’ve got five varieties, and started them in late January. At the moment, they are really pushing on, and are at the point where I will carefully pinch out the central growing tip. This is done in order to get the plant to send out side shoots. Since mid-March, I’ve had a chance to put these outside on warm sunny afternoons but they return to the sheltered environment by night, as they are not frost-hardy. Very importantly also, I do remember to shut the door and window before dusk!

Mother and baby.

Dahlias remind me that this problem-free philosophy is the way to go. They bring forth the most stunning flowers, yet they are such tender plants, and they have their troubles in life. Problem-free does not mean that I have no work to do. It means I’m happy to care for the plant in order to get enormous satisfaction in return.

Tomatoes

Tomato Tumbler

Generally, I grow three tomato plants in the glasshouse every year and a few of the tumbling ones outdoors. This year, I’ve gone completely bonkers. There are seven different varieties, and thirty-something plants altogether. However, I’ll be giving most of them away to friends cairde at the end of April or early May. There are a small few plants still unclaimed, so if you’d like a change from the taste of supermarket tomatoes, let me know. Of course, I don’t want any smartasses. I nearly fell off my stool last week…

“Would you like a few tomato plants?”, I asked.

“Oh, no thank you. You just grow them and I’ll come over to collect the tomatoes when they’re ready.”

Joyeuses Pâques.

Now, if ever there’s a perfect example of a problem-free philosophy, this is it! Everything will be OK. Just wait and see. You know what, when these restrictions are lifted, I’ll be more than happy to have my friend over to share in the tomato harvest! One hundred percent! Be certain though, that overpaid CEO’s won’t get within an asses roar.

Mina Lobata

Unusual leaf shape.

This is the last of my Six this week, but in fact after I took this photograph on Wednesday and checked the name on the seed packet, the Lion King and the Hakuna Matata sprang to mind. Mina Lobata. Hakuna Matata. In effect, it was this little seedling that sparked a few neurons in my head. That’s where neurons do their best work.

Spectacular for months.

Mina Lobata is commonly known as Spanish Flag or Exotic Love Vine. It’s a climber and, by all accounts, can reach up to 5-6 metres. I got the seed free saor in aisce with Amateur Gardening magazine before all that kind of thing stopped. Akin to many of my selected items over the past few weeks, I’ve not grown it before. I sowed it early last month and it is still only at 2cm. Definitely a slow starter! I’ll also sow seeds outside in mid-April and see how both compare. Hopefully, I’ll need to put up a few trellises before long. I love the name Mina Lobata, and I just can’t get the tune from the Lion King out of my head.

Hakuna Matata!
What a wonderful phrase
Hakuna Matata!
Ain't no passing craze
It means no worries for the rest of your days.
It's our problem-free philosophy.
Hakuna Matata!
Best Belgian chocolate.

It’s a Wrap

That’s my six this week and to finish, here’s a short recap video of end-of-March goings-on in the glasshouse.

The video is up there on the YouTube cloud thingy. There’s a commentator error towards the end… They are in fact cucumber seedlings, not spinach. Contract renewal negotions may break down.

Getting Very Busy Now

  • Gladioli and most of the begonias are planted up.
  • Trellis delivered.
  • First muggy night and that meant slug patrol.
  • Propagator put back to the attic.
  • About half of the daffodils put away to their summer corner.
  • Lilies planted.
  • Some of the grasses divided and planted up.
  • Salad vegetables ready to harvest from now onwards.
  • Some of the Sweet Peas planted out.
  • Enjoying the scent of wild garlic and furze while cycling. Two very different aromas, both wonderful.

That’s my lot for this week, a cháirde. I’ll be back with more next Saturday an Satharn seo chugainn. In the meantime, please visit Mr. Propagator’s garden blog where you can find many more Six on Saturday articles from around the world, together with details of how to participate if that’s your thing. I hope you have a great week. Slán go fóill.

Happy Easter,

Pádraig.

Free To A Good Home

Thursday, 1st April 2021.

As a result of the recent muggy evenings, there are an estimated eighteen thousand snails and slugs crawling about.

Effectively, I only need about five hundred to feed visiting birds, so I’m offering the entire surplus, in one or more lots, to keen gardeners. This offer will be snapped up quickly, so don’t be left behind.

Terms and conditions apply.

  • No charge.
  • Pick them yourself.
  • Come back for more.
  • Must be claimed before midnight.

Pádraig.